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CASE REPORT
Cerebral Syphilitic Gumma Suspected to have Developed during Primary Syphilis and Treated with Antibiotics in an HIV-Negative Patient
1)Department of General Internal Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 2)AIDS Clinical Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 3)Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 4)Department of Infectious Disease, Kohnodai Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine
Naonori TSUDA1), Tadanao HARIGAE1), Yoshinori MASUI1), Yoshimi KIKUCHI2), Masashi MIZOKAMI3) & Hirohisa YAZAKI1)2)4)
(Received October 11, 2016)
(Accepted February 6, 2018)
Key words: syphilitic, gumma, suspected primary syphilis, amoxicillin
Abstract

Cerebral syphilitic gumma is classified as tertiary syphilis. It has become rare owing to antiluetic treatment, but there are some cases reported recently which developed in less than 1 year after the suspected syphilis infection. We report herein on the case of a 41-year-old HIV- negative man who attended our hospital due to convulsions, diagnosed noninvasively as having cerebral syphilitic gumma, and treated effectively during suspected primary syphilis following supposed infection 9 months previously.

[ Kansenshogaku Zasshi 92: 386-390, 2018 ]

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